How to control dog and cat fleas with Steinernema carpocapsae nematodes? by Ganpati Jagdale

Currently, beneficial entomopathogenic Steinernema carpocapsae nematodes have been used as successful alternatives to chemical pesticides for controlling fleas. This is because nematodes are not harmful to dogs, cats and humans, easy to apply, and can kill both larval and pupal stages of fleas with 48 hours after their application and stop the emergence of future generation adults.

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Control whiteflies with predatory mite Amblyseius swirskii in greenhouses by Ganpati Jagdale

Amblyseius swirskii mites are commercially available as mixed stages of adults and larvae and are currently used as a biological control agent for controlling whiteflies, which are serious pests of greenhouse plants. Both the larvae and adults of Amblyseius swirskii are very active and therefore they can quickly disperse after their application in the greenhouses to seek their hosts including whiteflies. Amblyseius swirskii mites are known to feed voraciously on all the stages of whiteflies. As these mites can eat over 10 whiteflies or eggs or nymphs per day, they can eliminate whitefly populations quickly in the greenhouses.

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Biological Control of Spider Mites with Predatory Insects and Mites by Ganpati Jagdale

Biological control of spider mites can be achieved by using the predatory insects including green lacewing, ladybugs, minute pirate bugs and gall midges, and predatory mites including Amblyseius andersoni can directly feed on spider mites and reduce their population below their economic damage level. Please click on each predatory insect and mites for detailed information on their rate and timing of of application for the effective control spider mites in your greenhouse and gardens.

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When and how to apply Heterorhabditis indica for small hive beetle control? by Ganpati Jagdale

Small hive beetles, Aethina tumida are the most devastating insect pest of honey bee (Aphis mellifera) hives (Photo 1). Both adults and larvae of small hive beetle cause direct and indirect damages to honeybees. In case of direct damage, larvae of  small hive beetle directly feed on the honeybee brood, honey. pollen and destroy honeycombs. In case of indirect damage, both adults and larvae of small hive beetle spread yeast, Kodamaea ohmeri into the colony and yeast that grows on the honeycombs causes fermentation of honey, which is not suitable for human consumption or as the food for honeybees.

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Organic control of plant nematodes with entomopathogenic nematodes by Ganpati Jagdale

Plant nematodes are microscopic unsegmented roundworms (Photo 1) that cause severe damage to many plant species. A handful soil may contain several different species of plant nematodes including root-knot (Meloidogyne spp.), Sting (Belonolaimus spp.), lance (Hoplolaimus spp.), root- lesion (Pratylenchus spp.), ring (Mesocriconema spp.), stubby-root (Paratrichodorus spp.), spiral (Helicotylenchus spp.), dagger (Xiphinema spp.) and cyst (Heterodera spp.) nematodes (Photo 1). Of these nematode species, root- nematode is considered the most economically important pests of many plant species including field crops (cotton, peanut, soybean, corn etc) and vegetables (tomato, peppers, cucumbers, eggplants etc).

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Kill fall armyworms now and stop their northward migration during spring by Ganpati Jagdale

The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda is one of the most economically important pests of different plant species including corn, sorghum, forage, and turf grasses.  Although fall armyworm larvae actively damage crops throughout the United States during growing season, they generally die when harsh winter begins in northern, central and eastern United States. Then question arises how they could re-infest fields and cause damage to the crops grown in these areas during spring and summer again.

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Four beneficial nematodes from Portugal by Ganpati Jagdale

Four beneficial nematodes including Heterorhabditis bacteriophoraSteinernema feltiaeSteinernema intermedium and Steinernema kraussei have been reported from Portugal. 

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A new beneficial nematode Steinernema sacchari from South Africa by Ganpati Jagdale

A new beneficial entomopathogenic nematode collected from a sugarcane field located in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa was named as Steinernema sacchari.  

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A new species of entomopathogenic Steinernema nematodes by Ganpati Jagdale

A new species of entomopathogenic Steinernema nematode that isolated from southwest Bohemia, Czech Republic was identified and named as Steinernema poinari sp. n. (Nematoda : Steinernematidae) using both morphological and molecular techniques (Mráček et al., 2014). This new species was recovered from soil using Galleria baiting technique described by Bedding and Akhurst (1975).

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Beneficial Steinernema carpocapsae nematodes for sod webworm control by Ganpati Jagdale

Beneficial Steinernema carpocapsae nematodes have a potential to control tropical sod webworm, Herpetogramma phaeopteralis, one of the most damaging pests of turfgrass. Sod worms are lepidopterous insects that cause a serious damage to turfgrasses that are grown in the athletic fields, golf courses, home lawns and recreational parks. Adult moths do not cause any type of damage to turfgrass but their larval stages feed on turfgrass and reduce its aesthetic value.

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